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How to Use Google Docs to Write Your Blog Content - Boost Your Post Ranking.

How to Use Google Docs to Write Your Blog Content



There may be couple of situations where you would like to use Google docs as a blog editor and post blog entries directly without intervening the blog’s dashboard or any desktop software.The situations are :

if you are a professional blogger, all that you write must obviously be a result of your thorough research and should essentially involve hard work. Whether it is Blogspot or WordPress, text editors of both of these blogging platforms are up to scratch. Both text editors not only automatically save the post you are writing but also provide sufficient resources for content formatting which helps you present well your content.

I really find it hard to believe that it took so long for me to get acquainted with the immense and bottomless capabilities of Google Docs. I wish I had known earlier what Google Docs can offer when it comes to blogging. I am not exaggerating. Google docs is a unique tool to write blog perfectly, securely and insouciantly. It saves each word you write in real time on the Cloud and any possibility of loss of content is out of the question.
Now you may wonder what help Google Docs could be in case of internet connection being down? How are you supposed to deal with situation? Yes, there are ways. First of all, if you go offline on account of any disruption in your internet connection, Google Docs immediately lets you know that you are offline by showing an offline icon on top.

Why Microsoft Word Sucks for Blog Content Development

What I realized in my first few months as editor of the blog was that my frustration was primarily due to the tools we used.
Microsoft Word is a powerful application, but it has so many features that the average user only needs a tiny fraction of them. And for creating blog content, which tends to have fairly simple formatting needs, Word is frankly overkill.
Also, it can introduce the following issues:
  • Version control. After collaborating with an author over several drafts, I’d usually find my hard drive littered with several different copies of the post, not always certain which was the latest one.
  • Compatibility problems. Sometimes one version of the software won’t open files created in a later version. Or files created on a Mac don’t look the same on a PC. Neither is conducive to happy collaboration.
Formatting frustrations. Historically, content does not paste very cleanly from Word into WordPress. Even though things have improved, the results are still very dependent on the templates and styles used within Word.

Our Blog Template

Each time we create a blog post, regardless of who’s writing it or who it’s for, we use the same blog template, which is located in the Working Drafts folder for each client. This template includes eight sections:
Title—where the title of the post is written.
Keywords—where any keyword phrases that go in the post are listed.
Header Image—where we make a suggestion for the main image in the post.
Call-To-Action—where we list which call-to-action will be included on the web page immediately following the blog post text. We choose the white paper, ebook, webinar, or other offer fits best with the topic of the blog post.
Meta Description—where we write the meta description that will correspond with the post. The meta description is a “teaser” to the article that should be less than 150 characters and include the appropriate keywords. It shows up on the results page of Google (or other search engines) under the title of the post.
Teaser—where we write out the teaser text for the post. Some of our client’s blogs have a space for teaser text under the article title on the blog page—it’s just one or two lines “teasing” or describing the article. (It can be similar to the meta description, but it isn’t critical that this teaser text contains keywords, so we have the option of changing it up if we’d like.)
Email Subject—where the subject line of the article’s corresponding email is written. (Most of the time, we send out an email to notify our clients’ subscribers whenever we post a new article. It’s basically a custom-written blog subscriber email)
Email Body—where the body of the article’s corresponding email is written.

3 Reasons Google Docs Rocks for Content Collaboration

If you’ve not used Google Docs yet, it’s one of several lightweight Office-style applications that Google provides via Google Drive, its cloud-based storage service.
Some people use Google Drive solely for its remote storage, but if you ignore the apps that come along with it, you’re missing a trick.
In addition to Docs, Google also provides other online apps, free to anyone with a Google account, including:
  • Google Sheets — a spreadsheet app which can replace Microsoft Excel for most tasks
  • Google Slides — a presentation app that duplicates much of the functionality of PowerPoint or Keynote
  • Google Drawings — a drawing app for creating simple diagrams

Top 5 Google Docs Blog Add-ons

Google Drive, in its many capacities, has the additional power of letting you install add-on products to further increase its feature set, and therefore, your productivity.
There are tons of add-ons. However, these 5 are the top add-ons for when you use Google Docs for your blogging:


  1. SEMrush SEO Writing Assistant
If you’re blogging, it should be an inherent fact that SEO is important. It’s where the long term traffic and business comes from. It’s not subject to quick spikes and excitement, but it’s what many blogs and businesses are built on.
So how do you know you’re writing with SEO best practices in mind? Many people develop a fingertip feel for this, but the smart ones use a tool Like SEMrush’s SEO writing assistant.
It’s like Yoast, but for your Google Docs. Basically, it gives you:
  • An overall SEO score.
  • A readability measure.
  • Your core keywords.
  • Extra recommended keywords.
It really is a nifty little tool to help you be a better blogger.
  1. Google Keep
Google Keep allows you to clip notes and save and tag different notes. It’s kind of like Evernote, but immediately accessible via Google Docs.
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Image Source
If you do a ton of research, or really, if you just take notes in general (like all writers do, to some extent), this is a worthwhile add-on to install. It really shortens the time it takes to capture, find, and utilize key notes.
In general, the more you can keep all of your productivity tools in one place (i.e. in Google Docs), the better off you are.
  1. Google Translate
This is subject to your specific experience and use case, but if you’re writing for international audience, the Google Translate add-on is a must.
Even if you don’t currently write for international audiences or localize your content, it might be worth checking out. It makes it so easy to localize content that it may inspire you to do so (and widen the net of your possible audience you can reach).
  1. LucidCharts
LucidCharts lets you easily create and insert flowchart, UML, wireframe, mind map, and more diagrams directly into a Google Doc.
If you’re a visual content creator, this is a must have. It makes it so easy to create quick visuals to support your written word.
Besides, they made one of the greatest promotional videos of all time:
<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/ah6fmNEtXFI” frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen></iframe>
  1. SuperMetrics
I’m a big fan of measuring the effectiveness of your blogging. The better you can do that, the more visibility you have into your progress and results, as well as how you can improve.
SuperMetrics is a wonderful product that allows you to blend together various forms of data, including from Google Analytics, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, AdWords, Bing Ads, Moz, and Google Webmaster Tools.
That’s their core product, anyway. The Google Docs add-on lets you pull this information into your Google Doc for easy access. This makes it easy to write up internal reports, but it can also enable you to add different charts and graphs for blog post publications too.

Boost Your Post Ranking With Google Docs

How to Use Google Docs to Write Your Blog Content - Boost Your Post Ranking.
Google Docs have various Type of add-ons for boosting your blog rank on google but SEMrush is best add-ons in Google docs
it should be an inherent fact that SEO is important. It’s where the long term traffic and business comes from. It’s not subject to quick spikes and excitement, but it’s what many blogs and businesses are built on.
So how do you know you’re writing with SEO best practices in mind? Many people develop a fingertip feel for this, but the smart ones use a tool Like SEMrush’s SEO writing assistant.
It’s like Yoast, but for your Google Docs. Basically, it gives you:
  • An overall SEO score.
  • A readability measure.
  • Your core keywords.
  • Extra recommended keywords.

Voice Typing

to dictate text to your document
Google Docs Voice Typing
This one's a built-in (if somewhat hidden) Google Docs feature: Voice Typing. The only catch is that it only works in Chrome—but it works impressively well, supporting 43 languages and understanding commands like Create bulleted list.
So, instead of trying a dictation add-on, just click Tools -> Voice Typing, select your language, click the mic icon, and start talking. Google will type out what you say after a few moments' delay with surprising accuracy. In our tests, it worked better than the built-in dictation tools on Macs and PCs, and was nearly as good as Dragon NaturallySpeaking. And when you're ready to jump to the next line or need to delete the last word you said, just tell Google—it'll follow your bidding automatically.



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